Speak Up, Show Up – ARRK Oct 2021 Discussion

ARRK October 2021 Discussion with Katrina Frank

Participants restricted to Kalamazoo College Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration

A discussion on acting outwardly as an ally.

4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, October 19th
ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Katrina Frank

For October’s Speak Up, Show Up discussion participants will watch and analyze short video clips that show examples of microaggressions, prejudice, and oppression. Participants will also discuss and practice how they can speak up for others in a time of need. See the ARRK Teams Meeting Space for the two short videos (less than five minutes to watch both videos).


The AntiRacism Reading Knook (ARRK) is a collaboration between the K College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team. This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community.

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).

For further information on #ARRK see the KCIE AntiRacism Reading Knook page. To volunteer to lead one of these sessions complete the ARRK Discussion Leader application.

ARRK – September 2021 Discussion

ARRK September 2021 Discussion with Sarah Lindley

Participants restricted to Kalamazoo College Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration

A discussion on sections of My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies

4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, September 21st
ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Sarah Lindley

For September’s ARRK Sarah Lindley leading a discussion of Resma Menakem’s book My Grandmother’s Hands: Racialized Trauma and the Pathway to Mending Our Hearts and Bodies. She will be focusing on the preface through Chapter 1. A PDF of Menakem’s preface and first chapter can be found on the ARRK Teams Meeting Space. Another way to become acquainted with the book is through the On Being podcast episode, Resma Menakem, ‘Notice the Rage; Notice the Silence.’


The AntiRacism Reading Knook (ARRK) is a collaboration between the K College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team. This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community.

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).

For further information on #ARRK see the KCIE AntiRacism Reading Knook page. To volunteer to lead one of these sessions complete the ARRK Discussion Leader application.

ARRK (AntiRacism Reading KnooK) – June Discussion

ARRK June 2021 Discussion with Elizabeth Manwell

Participants restricted to Kalamazoo College Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration

A discussion where participants can share and discuss books, movies, podcasts, and music centering Black Joy.

4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 15th
ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Elizabeth Manwell

For June’s ARRK we will be sharing and discussing books, movies, podcasts, music, and more centering Black Joy. The discussion will start with a chapter from Samantha Irby’s We are Never Meeting in Real Life, “The Real Housewives of Kalamazoo” and the first episode of Issa Rae’s web series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl. A PDF of Irby’s chapter as well as a collaborative spreadsheet for participants to share their recommendations can be found on the ARRK Teams Meeting Space.


The AntiRacism Reading Knook (ARRK) is a collaboration between the K College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team. This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community.

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).

For further information on #ARRK see the KCIE AntiRacism Reading Knook page. To volunteer to lead one of these sessions complete the ARRK Discussion Leader application.

ARRK (AntiRacism Reading KnooK) – May Discussion

ARRK May 2021 Discussion with Brittany Liu

Discussion of a Michelle Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness

4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, May 18th
ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Brittany Liu

For May we will be focusing on “Chapter I: The Rebirth of Caste.” For a PDF of Chapter 1 & the Introduction please visit the ARRK Team Meeting Space or access the reading in the Library’s, The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness eBook.


The AntiRacism Reading Knook (ARRK) is a collaboration between the K College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team. This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community.

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).

For further information on #ARRK see the KCIE AntiRacism Reading Knook page. To volunteer to lead one of these sessions complete the ARRK Discussion Leader application.

ARRK (AntiRacism Reading KnooK) – April Discussion

ARRK April 2021 Discussion with Laura Furge

Discussion of moving from theoretical antiracist discussions to strategies to disrupt white supremacy.

4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, April 20th
ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Laura Furge

During the discussion we’ll look at the recent case of the Georgetown Professor Fired for Statements About Black Students as well as the article Are You Supporting White Supremacy?


The AntiRacism Reading KnooK (ARRK) is a collaboration between the K College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team. This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community.

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).

For further information on #ARRK see the KCIE AntiRacism Reading Knook page. To volunteer to lead one of these sessions complete the ARRK Discussion Leader application.

ARRK (AntiRacism Reading KnooK) – March 2021 Discussion

ARRK March 2021 Discussion with the Advancement Division

Discussion of “Chapter 3: Power” from Ibram X. Kendi’s
How to be an Antiracist
4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, March 16
ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Members of the Advancement Division

Members of the Advancement Division will also share their experience forming a division-wide antiracism book group.

You can read in the library’s How to be an Antiracist eBook or a PDF is available on the ARRK Meeting space.


The AntiRacism Reading KnooK (ARRK) is a collaboration between the K College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team. This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community.

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).

For further information on #ARRK see the KCIE AntiRacism Reading Knook page. To volunteer to lead one of these sessions complete the ARRK Discussion Leader application.

ARRK (AntiRacism Reading KnooK) – Feb. Discussion

ARRK February 2021 Discussion

Discussion of “Day 6 You and White Exceptionalism” from Layla F. Saad’s
Me and White Supremacy
4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, February 16
ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Kelly Frost

You can read in the library’s Me and White Supremacy eBook or a PDF is available on the ARRK Meeting space.


The AntiRacism Reading KnooK (ARRK) is a collaboration between the K College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team. This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community.

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).

For further information on #ARRK or to volunteer to lead one of these sessions, visit the KCIE Reading for Change LibGuide.

19: This Month in Black History – James Baldwin

By: Bruce Mills

Over the past few years, the words of novelist, playwright, essayist, and activist James Baldwin (1924-1987) have been prominent in our national dialogue. Creating his documentary from Baldwin’s writings and interviews, Raoul Peck received an academy award nomination for I Am Not Your Negro in 2016. Two years later, Barry Jenkins wrote and directed If Beale Street Could Talk based on the novel of the same name. From brief references to full articles on Baldwin in a range of sites such as theGrio, New York Times, and The Atlantic, we can see how broadly his voice informs discussions of race.

That Baldwin’s work is experiencing a renaissance is not surprising given his incisive, humane, radical, and intimate insights on what it means to navigate private and public spaces as a gay Black man in America. For this installment of the 19th series, I wish to offer a snapshot of how the life and writing of James Baldwin intersected with Kalamazoo College.

Baldwin at K
Invited by members of the English Department, Baldwin came to campus in mid-November 1960 where he delivered a talk on “the novel” and an address in the lecture series “Goals on the American Society.” By this time in his career, he had published an autobiographical novel, Go Tell It on the Mountain (1953), a first play, The Amen Corner (1954), an essay collection, Notes of a Native Son (1955), and Giovanni’s Room (1956).

During his week-long stay, he met with students, faculty, and staff during lunches, dinners, “fireside” chats, and in English classes. Archival photos of his visit show him in conversation with faculty and students in Hicks and in K’s WJMD radio studio. In this latter picture, we can see a copy of Notes of a Native Son. In astutely examining the legacy of white supremacy in America and abroad as well as his own experiences growing up in Harlem, Baldwin emerged as one of the country’s premier essayists. And, with the publication of The Fire Next Time in January of 1963, he was recognized as one of the leading writers, intellectuals, and activists of the 1960s, sharing the stage, often quite literally, with Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr., and other well- and lesser-known individuals battling for civil rights.

But the lasting presence of his voice at K came through the publication of his campus address, “In Search of a Majority,” in Nobody Knows My Name (1961). Called upon to speak on “minority rights,” he flips the script. In front of a nearly all White audience, he began with these reflections: “I am supposed to speak this evening on the goals of American society as they involve minority rights, but what I am really going to do is to invite you to join me in a series of speculations. Some of them are dangerous, some of them painful, all of them reckless.” He concluded this opening with the following assertion: “It seems to me that before we can begin to speak of minority rights in this country, we’ve got to make some attempt to isolate or to define the majority.”

Baldwin then asked his White listeners to learn of their own history, to reflect upon the evolution of White identity, and thus to resist the tendency to seek absolution through some redemptive story of Black life. Running through his talk is a central strand of Baldwin’s ongoing reflections on America. “The great force of history,” he would write in “The White Man’s Guilt” (1965), “comes from the fact that we carry it within us, are unconsciously controlled by it in many ways, and history is literally present in all that we do. It could scarcely be otherwise, since it is to history that we owe our frames of reference, our identities, and our aspirations.”

This is why he invites the Kalamazoo College audience of 1960 to understand “minority” as a definition constructed by and for the “majority.” In effect, history teaches that a White majority marks their status on a kind of racial ladder. The question for Baldwin is not who am I (as a “minority” in American society) but who, exactly, are you (as a so-called “majority”)? He asks, how have you constructed me? What desires or fears drive the failure to account for my human weight and complexity, something that he explores in “Stranger in the Village,” the concluding essay in Notes of a Native Son.

What so many current readers—Black, Brown, and White—hear in James Baldwin is a truth telling. Of course, different audiences will receive and interpret these truths from the varied spaces of their own lived experiences and histories. To end, then, it seems fitting to return to what those at the College heard from the final lines of “In Search of a Majority” sixty years ago. As with any truth, they stitch together past, present, and future. Listen:

…and I want to suggest this: that the majority for which everyone is seeking which must reassess and release us from our past and deal with the present and create standards worthy of what a man may be—this majority is you. No one else can do it. The world is before you and you need not take it or leave it as it was when you came in.


These messages are aimed at educating the K community on African-American history and culture, and are brought to you by The Faculty Advisory Board of the Arcus Center for Social Justice leadership and the HHMI Inclusive Excellence Faculty team, as we continue to work towards being an anti-racist Institution. 19 marks 1619, the year in which the first set of African slaves were brought to what would become the United States, and June 19th, 1865, marks the day that Blacks celebrate the end of enslavement in the US. Both of these dates, and their meanings, were largely unknown to many outside of the Black community. We need to understand that much of the “surprise” experienced by many at the continued uprisings led by the Black lives Matter movement derives from a lack of knowledge of the rich fabric of Black History.

Regina Stevens-Truss, HHMI Inclusive Excellence + Chemistry department
Lisa Brock, ACSJL + History department

ARRK (AntiRacism Reading Knook) – Oct. Discussion

ARRK October Discussion

Discussion of Chapter 1 from Beverly Daniel Tatums’
Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?
4-5 p.m. on Tuesday, October 20
AARK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Discussion Leader: Lisa Brock


Developed through collaboration with K-College library staff and the Kalamazoo College Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team, the AntiRacism Reading Knook (#ARRK) initiative seeks to facilitate dialogue on antiracism and engagement with the KCIE #Reading for Change book collection. Purchase of and greater access to the collection has been funded through the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) grant. ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce the barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise to provide context and guide discussion,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thus
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.

Please come virtually to the second event of #ARRK. Lisa Brock will lead discussion on Chapter 1 from Beverly Daniel Tatum’s Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? Mark your calendars for 4-5 pm on Tuesday, October 20 at #AARK Meeting space (MS Teams).

In August, KCIE distributed copies of Tatum’s book to faculty and staff. If you did not receive a book, contact Regina Stevens-Truss (Regina.Stevens-Truss@kzoo.edu) or Bruce Mills (Bruce.Mills@kzoo.edu).

For further information on #ARRK, visit the AARK LibGuide.

Introducing #ARRK the AntiRacist Reading Knook

The AntiRacism Reading KnooK (#ARRK) is a collaboration between the K-College library staff and our Inclusive Excellence (KCIE) leadership team.  This initiative is NOT a book club, but seeks to facilitate campus-wide engagement with the books in the KCIE Reading for Change book collection. This collection was created to encourage learning about and facilitate greater access to antiracism information to all members of the campus community. 

ARRK aims to:

  1. reduce barrier to entry into reading antiracism books,
  2. identify and highlight campus facilitators with experience teaching and/or disciplinary expertise who can provide context and guide discussions of specific texts,
  3. foster broader relationships among faculty and staff, and thu
  4. build greater capacity for an inclusive campus through sustained and focused engagement with shared texts.
  5. help catalyze members of the campus to engage in small group discussions of entire books in the collection (self-organized book clubs, if you will).  

Join us!

Please join us virtually in the first #ARRK event to be held:
September 29, 2020
4-5 p.m.

#ARRK Meeting space (MS Teams)
Natalia Carvalho-Pinto and Francisco Villegas will lead a discussion of Chapter 3 from Beverly Daniel Tatums’  Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? 

Every employee of the College as well as members of the Board of Trustees was sent a copy of this book in August.

If you did not receive a book, contact Regina Stevens-Truss (Regina.Stevens-Truss@kzoo.edu) or Bruce Mills (Bruce.Mills@kzoo.edu).

For further information on #ARRK or to volunteer to lead one of these sessions, visit the AARK LibGuide.